AIDS in the world and South Africa

29 May

graphs

The AIDS pandemic in South Africa
The HIV/AIDS pandemic has mostly affects the Sub Saharan African according to researches and studies that have been done recently. Research shows that about Thirteen million jobs are lost on an annual base due to deaths associated with AIDS and this is greatly affecting the Sub Saharan African economy. This is shown that despite recent campaigns that are going on the rates of those who are affected daily is increasing and mostly teenagers and young adults are the ones being infected as they are practising pre-marital unprotected sex. The graph below shows AIDS statics around the world.
South Africa is the most affected Sub Saharan country an estimated 5.6 million people were living with HIV and AIDS in South Africa in 2009, the highest number of people in any country. In the same year, it is estimated that 310,000 South Africans died of AIDS-related causes, reflecting the huge number of lives that the country has lost to AIDS over the last three decades. Nelson Mandela said to the nation, “We cannot fight AIDS unless we do much more to fight TB.” The fight against AIDS in South Africa has to go a long way if they wish to live in
an AIDS free generation.
Prevalence is 17.8 percent among those aged 15-49, with younger adults being particularly affected.HIV prevalence among those aged two and older also varies by province with the Western Cape (3.8 percent) and Northern Cape (5.9 percent) being least affected, and Mpumalanga (15.4 percent) and KwaZulu-Natal (15.8 percent) at the upper end of the scale.
Marking a change in South Africa’s history of HIV the South African Government launched a major HIV counselling and testing campaign (HCT) in 2010. Since its implementation, the HCT campaign has had a notable impact on the availability and uptake of HIV testing and treatment.

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graph assignment

29 May

The AIDS pandemic in South Africa
The HIV/AIDS pandemic has mostly affects the Sub Saharan African according to researches and studies that have been done recently. Research shows that about Thirteen million jobs are lost on an annual base due to deaths associated with AIDS and this is greatly affecting the Sub Saharan African economy. This is shown that despite recent campaigns that are going on the rates of those who are affected daily is increasing and mostly teenagers and young adults are the ones being infected as they are practising pre-marital unprotected sex. The graph below shows AIDS statics around the world.
South Africa is the most affected Sub Saharan country an estimated 5.6 million people were living with HIV and AIDS in South Africa in 2009, the highest number of people in any country. In the same year, it is estimated that 310,000 South Africans died of AIDS-related causes, reflecting the huge number of lives that the country has lost to AIDS over the last three decades. Nelson Mandela said to the nation, “We cannot fight AIDS unless we do much more to fight TB.” The fight against AIDS in South Africa has to go a long way if they wish to live in
an AIDS free generation
Prevalence is 17.8 percent among those aged 15-49, with younger adults being particularly affected.HIV prevalence among those aged two and older also varies by province with the Western Cape (3.8 percent) and Northern Cape (5.9 percent) being least affected, and Mpumalanga (15.4 percent) and KwaZulu-Natal (15.8 percent) at the upper end of the scale.
Marking a change in South Africa’s history of HIV the South African Government launched a major HIV counselling and testing campaign (HCT) in 2010. Since its implementation, the HCT campaign has had a notable impact on the availability and uptake of HIV testing and treatment.

graphs

Online News

24 May

Online debate: It would be better for everybody, including journalists and their
audiences, if newspapers just went ahead and died.

The issue that newspapers should just die has created a lot of controversies all over the globe with those for new technologies stating that this world is quickly becoming a global village and newspapers will no longer be needed as they no longer hold a place in society. But is it really fair to just kill the newspapers when millions of people in Africa and other poor parts of the world depend solely on the newspaper for information and news of the world aside from their communities. This essay will be against the death of newspapers and will try to portray how much we still the newspaper in the world. It is going to show various points and arguments that we still need the newspaper.

Traditional Journalism vs. Social/Citizen Journalism

Newspapers, the television and the radio have been a source of information to many families for a very long time. These are the medium that are responsible for bringing information and news to most of African societies even up to this day. Indeed the 21st century has brought about a huge immense change and because it is a new information medium we have to embrace it however we have to put it in mind the emergence of a new information medium does not mean we have to throw out the old. “I think we were slow to catch on,” says Jay Smith, president of Cox Newspapers, a chain of 17 daily and 25 non-daily newspapers.  These same mediums we want to throw away carried us to these new mediums and we have to respect and give them credit. Newspaper moreover are still very much profitable for example, the Inland Press Association recently reported that, contrary to expectations, many papers are still profitable. And advertising research firm Borrell Associates recently predicted that newspapers’ print ad revenue will actually increase 2.4 percent in 2010, and 8.7 percent by 2014.

Citizen Journalism vs. Journalist

Citizen journalism is when the ordinary citizen takes pen and paper and writes news and becomes more involved in the news that will be going on. They do this through blogs and various social Medias like twitter and Facebook. They are most not credible and might lie in their story as they will need followers for their blogs. Moreover people in local areas will not be able to access the use of news media’s. They are not bound by ethics and should not be treated as journalists. The question becomes are they credible, factual and do they use credible sources therefore we still have a need for a newspaper that is written by those who are bound by law and ethics for such a job.


Online vs. Print

 

Indeed online printing has changed the value of literature, in relation to how and who is reading the article and why are they reading it. Online printing has made it made it possible for mass communication; nine people cannot read a book at once if it is a hard copy but it is possible online. However we still need print media as some of the members of our society are computer illiterate and will be unable to access information online. Not everyone is ready to face a computer screen and read a book from a screen for nine hours. Online media is bad for members of our society who have bad eyesight.Investment banker Ken Marlin also warns against simply hurling the print edition into cyberspace. “It’s not good enough to take what you have in print form and put it up on the Web,” he says. “You have to take advantage of what the new medium offers and what the new medium allows you to do.” While a newspaper might list Italian restaurants in a neighborhood, its Web site could allow readers to say, “I’m standing on a corner. Tell me the inexpensive Italian restaurants within half a mile or so and book a reservation.”

 

Online journalism provides news instantly in a matter of minutes. There comes the question has it been classified, is it credible, and is it true or it has just been produced to keep up with the great consumer demand. There is need for factual checks and editing. Indeed newspapers are struggling but they are here to stay as our low incoming society needs them. “The Source: Newspapers by the Numbers”“The key to the future of newspapers is the effort to build a broad portfolio of products around the core product, the traditional newspaper, and to connect with both general and targeted audiences, The corner barbershop frequenters, our elderly people, and the local dealers and shops that still need to put their ads in the local newspaper. We still need to put our birthday wishes in the birthday column, do the puzzle and read the horoscope columns, our children still need to read the kiddies columns and do the little colour in and puzzles. Gordon Borrell CEO of Borrell Associates says newspapers should start by relaxing a little, and realizes that readers still prefer the printed paper for local news. “People don’t go to the Internet in huge droves for local school board news or local crime news,” he says. “I think [newspapers] should stop giving that away on the Internet.”

Conclusion

We might have moved along with the new media’s that have come, some have adapted well and some have struggled to get along with the emergences that have occurred. Many people still need to use the newspaper as they cannot afford to move along with technology, are old and unable to use the technologies provided or are sight handicapped. Adding all the arguments in a nut shell there is still need for the daily morning newspaper and the newspaper must and must not die.

I think we should keep their print papers for a while longer. It’s a simple question of profit and catering to what users want. If you have thousands of users that want their paper, and it’s economically justifiable, just keep it.

The tricky part is determining how much loss in paper subscribers you should tolerate before shutting down the huge printing presses. I have no good answer to that other than to know your numbers. Paper profit needs to cover paper printing and distribution. Journalism costs can be split between channels.

Many people believe newspapers are dying and eventually will no longer exist. What are your thoughts on this?

I think they will persist, just not their paper versions. Many of them are looking at dwindling subscription numbers, year after year, and are trying to figure out what to do. How do you move to the digital worlds while keeping quality, relevance, and profit?

As for readership, while it’s true that news websites are gaining ground on newspapers, Martin Langeveld, a columnist for Harvard’s Nieman Journalism Lab, recently found that more than 96 percent of newspaper reading is still done in the print editions. The online share of the newspaper audience only amounts to about 3 percent, he found.

Until someone figures out how to make online news sites profitable, newspapers aren’t going anywhere.

Reference List

Baran, Stanley J. Introduction To Mass Communication: Media Literacy and Culture. 6th ed. New York: Mortimer, (2010). Print.

Medina, Jennifer. “Los Angeles Schools, Facing Budget Cuts, Decide to Seek Corporate Sponsors.” New York Times 16 Dec. 2010: 22. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. Web. 4 May 2011.

Posnick, Sherry-Goodwin.  “Public school kids now a captive advertising audience?” California Teachers Association. CTA. Mar. 2010. Web. Apr. 2011.

washingtonpost.com

thenewstribune.com

 naplesnews.com

 

Celebrating Zimbabwes Independence In South Africa

30 Apr

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How exactly did you Celebrate Zimbabwe’s Independence

As Zimbabweans in South Africa celebrate Independence

By Charlotte Chatukuta

27 April 2012

Zimbabwean Chimurenga songs playing in the background. Hands waving up and down, Bodies swaying to and fro. Alcohol flowing and the smell of food reaches your nostrils. The music stops suddenly and a voice shouts in the microphone, “Are you ready to party?” The crowd goes wild with shouts, “Yes!”And “Hey put the music back on!”Welcome to the independence party.

Attaining 32 years of independence is a big deal right? Now my question as a curious observer becomes,” How exactly do you celebrate the birth of your country? Do you get drunk and forget why you came to the celebrations in the first place? Or do you do scandalous things in the name of celebrating your countries milestone? Sleep around and act like nothing happened the next morning? Or rather lazy it up in your house after all its just another lazy day? Or just, just maybe spend it with your family and friends educating each other on the importance of independence and celebrating this hard earned privilege. Monash students celebrating Zimbabwean Independence

My second question then becomes, “How do you celebrate your countries independence day in a foreign country?”Do you cower in the background and let it pass because it is not a national holiday where you are? Or do you go about partying through the place because you want to show people where you come from? Or rather do you show other people how it is done at home, spend some quality time with the family and some of those dear close friends? Or just rather celebrate Mzansi style and call your friends and family for a loud noise fully party where you get down and dirty to wake up the next morning with a hangover?

Scores of Monash Zimbabwean students came together on Saturday the twenty-first to celebrate a post-independence party. Screensavers with the country’s flag, court of arms and the president’s face popped up on everyone’s phone as everyone suddenly became patriotic for a moment. The party started off on an educational note as the history of the countries struggle was narrated to the fun waiting students who looked impatient and bored and ready to hit the dance floor.

The night was a night of fun as talents were show cased with Jah Bee giving the crowd a reggae number, “Zimbabwe my Zimbabwe.”

That made the dance floor a contest for those with the right moves. Everyone went wild with shouts of, ”Jah Bee! Jah Bee!”And Fortune a poet was not to be left out in the fun he gave the crowd a heart touching piece of how blood and toil was shed for everyone to enjoy the special day called independence.

Miss Stabiso Ndlovu a Monash student said that she really enjoyed herself for the night, “At least it was different from my boring Saturdays and every country’s independence has to be celebrated, that’s who we are as a person. History made us who we are!” Michael Mapfunde a Monash student who resides in resident 6 said, Independence was all about having fun to him and his boys. “So we bought beer had a drink up at my house and me and my boys drank up a storm. I don’t really care much about the history stories that are told”

And not only Monash celebrated others did too Mr Shadreck Muyenga a Zimbabwean national who stays at Askari lodge in Maghaliesburg

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said he and all other Zimbabweans workers who work at the lodge took a day off and had a braai in the back yard, “We even spoiled ourselves to a game drive. “He went on to say, “Independence always reminds me of how we suffered so we commemorate those who gave it to us each year, it is very important for me and my family.”

Mr Thando Matanhire a security guard who works for Top Security Company said that he took his family out on a family day as independence is very important to him and his children have to know about his countries struggles even if they do not stay in Zimbabwe.”Me and my wife took the children out to an amusement party where we had fun as a family even told them what this holiday means to me.”He went on to say, “Later on, of course without the children me and my buddies went out and got soaked in alcohol. After all Independence Day happens once a year and being here in South Africa meant more fun.”

And so it seems that everyone had their own unique way of celebrating being independent. Braais, drink-ups, family gatherings, and hook-ups I came to the final conclusion that It always gets down to one word after all, partying! Seems everyone finally got to one thing in the end.A party!

 

Aside

Storage blues s…

22 Mar

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Storage blues solved

Abound Builds More Storage Vessels

By Charlotte Chatukuta

22 March 2012

Abound self storage company is in the midst of building new self storage tanks in a bid to curb storage blues for Monash students and local residents. Construction is in progress with almost half of the storage cases having reached completion. This will help students to store their belongings at the end of the year as previously students had to carry their belongings as far as Magaliesburg.

The manager at Abound Storage Company stated that they had received complaints from students that their storage vessels were not enough so they upgraded and demolished previous storage houses. He went on to say, “Foreign students were the most affected as they have no relations in South Africa, therefore we are the ones who cater for them.”

Promise a construction worker who spray paints and forklifts said that they are building new vessels and he has been working for Abound for nearly ten years said that they mostly cater for people who live nearby. He also stated that they buy the best materials for their storage vessels Melusi a supervisor at Abound is in charge of checking for breakages, customer care, problems inside the storerooms and upgrading of the storage vessels stated that goods can be kept for as far as five years. Once students do not pay they are given three months notice and if they still do not respond the goods will be taken to auction.

Anesu a Monash student who is of Zimbabwean nationality is happy about the changes that are taking place at Abound as he has been having problems with storing his belongings at the end of last year 2011.”Now we can store our goods near and easy “he said, “We have been having problems with keeping our belongings as there was not enough storage space at Abound.” he continued to say. Storage prices vary according to individual likes and they start from three hundred rands per month and they have to be paid before goods are taken into storage. The manager stated that their goods never get stolen as they have guard dogs and guards to keep the vessels.”We have these ferocious dogs to keep watch for thieves that way customer always get their goods and belongings when they need them.

Apart from storing household goods and clothes they also have trucks and buses for rentals to ferry people to and fro. This new step has been welcomed by students as the storage blues will be gone.

South Africa still denying the Dalai Lama a visa

6 Oct

Old Man No Visa For You

And South Africa Still Says No To The Dalai Lama Application

6 October 6, 2011

By Charlotte Chatukuta

Tenzin Gyatso the Dalai Lama a religious and spiritual leader who was supposed to attend the birthday party of fellow spiritual leader and friend the aged bishop Desmond Mpilo Tutu may not after all attend the birthday party he was scheduled to attend as the South African government has been denying him the visa into the country. Speculations have risen that this is because of the close ties that are arising between South Africa and China as the Dalai Lama has been living in exile in India after fleeing from China as he is a leader of the Tibetan uprisings.

Apparently this is not the first time that he has been denied the visa by South Africa in 2009 he was denied again and this year his application has been pending since August and thus resulted in him withdrawing his visa application. What can take a visa application that long if South Africa wants the Dalai Lama in the country? South Africa has been condemned by the Human Rights Watch over the Dalai Lamas visa refusal. South Africa is denying the refusal blaming the Dalai Lama for not using the original copies of his passport and withdrawing his visa application.

The Noble Price Committee has been protesting in favour of the Dalai Lama to be granted access into the country for his Saturday speech in Cape Town. Mr Thabo Masebe the government spokesperson says there has not been any application received but Mr Clayton Monyela a spokesperson for the department of international Relations and Cooperation said they received the application and they are still considering granting it.But would south Africa deny The Dalai Lama a visa unless they are covering up their ties for a relationship with the Chinese one has to wonder whether tea and cupcakes will be shared between the Dalai Lama and the Bishop?

He is the next gospel music sensation.

3 Oct

Shalom:He is the next gospelsinging sensation

A holy melody in the making

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By Charlotte Chatukuta

02 October 2011

The first sound you hear is a melody coming from the piano and a burst of a voice so clear it touches your heart and when he starts singing in church people throw money at him as they just cannot resist the blessed voice of Shalom. He is known as a music sensation at Monash with a voice of gold Abiathar Shalom Dambeni is heading towards a bright musical future. Known by many with his stage name of Shalom. As one of the praise and worship leaders of choir at Revival International Ministries he is doing wonders for the church. Coming from a musical family it was not hard for him to find his own feet musically; his sister is recording an album. He started singing serious in high school where he learned the piano and the African drum of which he is so passionate about. He listens mostly to gospel music and derives inspiration mostly from the Holy Spirit and gospel gurus like Kirk Franklin, The Winans and many more but he says he likes to sing in his own unique way. He writes and sings his own songs mostly but also sings hymns. As he is a student aiming for a degree he is not going to go professional as he does not want his musical career to go in the way of his school work.”I want to get my degree first.”He said.

He believes Monash has a lot of music potential, “Guys like Mon Christ and guys in my church are headed for the best and if they make it then the music world of gospel is very bright.”He said. He practises daily in his room as he has a piano and at church choir practise. Miss Onesisa Sibanda a neighbour said that Shalom is very talented and she looks forward to hearing him everyday practising from his house.”That boy has talent.”She said, “His voice just touches my soul and reminds me that God is real every time.” She said she believes he is the next gospel music sensation and will make waves.Mr Ronald Mupazviriwo a student at Monash said he heard Shalom singing when he visited the Revival International Ministries church and could not believe what he heard.”Looking at him I did not think he could sing but when he opened his mouth I believed it.”Miss Balesihle Ncube a fellow church member said she looks forward to his performance every Sunday as Shalom’s voice blesses her very much.”Shalom is definitely going to make it big.”She said “He has made the church choir very interesting.” Shalom said he wishes he could just relies an album tomorrow but that cannot be as this requires great practise and sacrifices and he has to wait for a year or two for the perfect time to unleash his voice to the world. Having heard him sing in his interview there is definitely nothing to stop this blessed man of Gospel from making it big and the sky is definitely the limit for him.